Sharks of Tenerife
Angel Shark
Angel Shark
Angel sharks have an unusual look. The front of their body is broad and the pectoral fins are flat. The rear is more shark-like and muscular. The position of the gills constitutes an important detail to distinguish those sharks from rays. Most species inhabit shallow temperate or tropical seas but some can dive up to 1300 metres in depth.

Blue Shark
Blue Shark
The blue shark, which can grow almost up to 4 metres in length, is the most widely distributed animal in the world. It can be found in all deep, warm and tropical waters on the surface to about 350m. He is also one of the most easily recognized sharks as he has a deep indigo blue from above changing to white underneath. They are not considered as an aggressive species and rarely attack humans. They feed on squid, shrimp, lobster and crab.

Mako Shark
Mako Shark
The mako shark can be found in ale offshore temperate and tropical seas. He mainly feeds on fish like mackerels and tuna but may also eat other sharks or turtles. His back is metallic blue while he is white underneath. Mako sharks are famous for their speed (50 km/h up to 74 km/h) and their leaps which can be higher than 9 metres. There are some cases known when a mako shark jumped on a boat after been caught by a hook. Scientists calculated that mako sharks might be able to swim with a speed of 100 kilometres per hour or more due to their extremely hydrodynamic shape and high muscle mass.

Hammerhead Shark
Smooth Hammerhead Shark
The smooth hammerhead can be found all around the world but prefers moderate water temperatures. Its name is derived from the shape of its head, which is flattened and extended into a hammer shape. Smooth, because it's missing the indent in the middle of the front. Its colour is mostly olive or dark grey on his back and white underneath. It is the second largest hammerhead shark and can grow up to 5 metres. The smooth hammerhead feeds on schooling fish such as herring and menhaden. The smooth hammerhead's diet consists of other sharks, shrimp, skates, crustaceans, cephalopods and even its own species.

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